Antelope, Veggie, and Noodle Bowl

Antelope, Veggie, Noodle Bowl | wild game recipe | Wild Food Blog

I originally called this dish a stir fry, but it’s not really a stir-fry by technical definitions. I didn’t use a wok. It wasn’t cooked quickly. There was not smoke or splashing oil involved. It was rather tame in the kitchen. More of a sauté, stir a bit, and simmer until thickened. So I’m calling it a “bowl.”

But whatever you want to call it, the end result was delicious! I always say that, though, don’t I?? But this time, I have Roy’s words to back it up! His words were something along the lines of, “That’s definitely a top 5 meal!” Yup, top 5. :)

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Wild Game (Antelope) Curry

Antelope Curry Recipe | wild game recipes | Wild Food Blog

I could eat curries once a week (especially in the fall and winter). I’ve tried in the past, but then Roy gets burned out pretty quickly. So we go months and months without eating them. During this time, every time I open my spice drawer, I see the large bag of curry powder sitting there…far too full…

But it’s been awhile since we’ve eaten curry, so Roy was up for it again! Lucky for me!

I love that with curries, you can just throw a bunch of spices together in a pot and let it simmer. Then the outcome is tender meat with powerful, bold flavors.

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Missouri River Trout Sushi Rolls

We held an Olympics themed party last weekend and decided to make a whole lot of sushi rolls for it! A couple of weeks ago I had baked, deboned, and froze a fresh Missouri River trout, so we had plenty of fish to work with.

Trout Sushi

A couple of years ago, some friends showed us that making your own rolls was incredibly easy, fun, cheap, and pretty dang tasty! Fresh sushi-ready fish is a bit pricey, though, so we typically just make veggie rolls or use crab, smoked or leftover salmon, and once even fried chicken! With trout bits ready to go, we decided to give it a try.

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Moroccan Venison Stew

Moroccan Venison Stew

We were enjoying sunny days and 40 degree temperatures, but alas, it has cooled down. No reason to complain as my parents in South Dakota are experiencing their 37th (or something close to that….) blizzard of the 2013-2014 winter season! Plus, Jethro doesn’t get coated with mud when everything freezes..

With the cooler temperatures, it was time to break out a new stew recipe. Our freezer was getting full as I spent an afternoon awhile back cooking large batches of dry beans and freezing them in serving-size baggies (Much cheaper than the cans and they taste fresher, too!). So to make some room, I figured we could use some of the chickpeas. And chickpeas instantly reminded me of a Moroccan-inspired stew.

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Stuffed Pheasant

I generally don’t have favorites. It all depends on the day, my mood, simply the context. I’m going to make a bold statement though when I say this is my favorite recipe on the blog so far…maybe favorite dish we’ve ever cooked. Bold, I know, but each bite was full of so much flavor with the slight bite from the gorgonzola cheese, the sweetness from the dates, and the bacon’s saltiness.

Stuffed Pheasant

Awhile back, as Roy and I were walking Jethro, we started brainstorming different ways to make the pheasant we had planned for the next day. This is the result, so it is definitely a joint-venture recipe, with Roy taking the lead!

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Deer Enchiladas

Ground deer meat that’s been marinating soaking up flavors of beer, lime, and spices, plus onions, garlic, and several varieties of peppers all rolled in a tortilla and then smothered (not drizzled) in enchilada sauce and cheese (plus a cold beer) equals one filling, satisfying cold-weather meal.

Deer Enchiladas

I’ve been meaning to make enchiladas for awhile now, but they tend to be a bit time-consuming. And lately, our schedules have not allowed too much extra time for complicated meals.

Deer Enchiladaa

But once I started making these and decided to cut out a few steps (the dipping of tortillas into sauce or the frying of tortillas) to make them both easier, less messy, and healthier, I realized they really weren’t too time-consuming…a nice surprise!

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Mediterranean Elk Meatballs

I was hesitant make to meatballs out of our ground elk (or antelope or deer) because we don’t add any fat to the meat we grind. This keeps the meat lean and true to its own flavor, but it also makes it less cohesive when forming patties. Fortunately, we found that forming meatballs didn’t pose any problems!

Mediterranean Elk Meatballs

Growing up in South Dakota, Swedish-style meatballs were about the only type of meatballs we ever ate. And during the cold (sometimes absolutely frigid), dark, windy winters, we ate plenty of them, smothered in homemade gravy and poured over mashed potatoes. It warmed our bellies!

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Southwest Deer Jerky

A couple of weeks ago, I shared how we make our wild game jerky. As I indicated, we had only successfully seasoned our jerky with pre-made seasoning kits. Over Christmas break, I decided to experiment some more with a homemade seasoning. I thawed out some ground deer meat and came up with a Southwest jerky recipe.

Southwest Jerky

We found it to be every bit as tasty as the seasoning kits. My dad even thought it was better! But he may have been a bit biased….

Our Southwest mixture uses only dry seasonings (well, except for a splash of Worcestershire sauce). We personally haven’t had as much luck with the soy sauce and other liquid based recipes. Maybe we were just doing something wrong with them…more experimentation is needed!

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Bear Stuffing

Stuffing should not be limited to Thanksgiving and Christmas dinners. It is not an ideal spring or summer dish, but it tastes just as good on a cold January evening as it does at Thanksgiving dinner.

This recipe (adapted from this one at allrecipes) is full of bread, meat, veggies, and fruit so it is a meal unto itself! It will leave you full and satisfied.

Bear Sausage Stuffing | wild game recipes | Wild Food Blog

As I’ve mentioned in my previous bear posts, we start with our breakfast spiced bear sausage and spice it up accordingly. For this recipe, I marinated for about 30 hours one pound of ground bear sausage with fennel, sage, thyme, rosemary, and a Chardonnay.

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Making Deer Jerky

We ground up most of our deer meat this year and have turned much of it into jerky. It’s a great and healthy snack food, and we love taking it on our road trips…Jethro (our dog) likes it, too, as he inevitably gets a few pieces (especially when we forget to pack dog food…)!

Deer Jerky

We used to make deer jerky in a dehydrator, but we found that it would dry the meat out too much, so Roy switched to making it in the oven.

The first step is to grind some deer meat.

So far we’ve only used seasoning kits…they are so easy to use, and most of them taste great. (We’re still experimenting with our recipes, so hopefully we’ll be able to post a successful one soon!) So add the seasoning to the ground meat.  Our favorite has been the Hi Mountain Cracked Pepper and Garlic seasoning. Follow meat to spice ratio on seasoning packet. Don’t skimp on the seasonings even a little bit!

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